A map of multiple sclerosis by latitude

Multiple Sclerosis has long been known as an autoimmune disorder that affects more people living in the Pacific Northwest than in most other parts of the country, and the world. Scientists still don't have a firm answer why that is.

But researchers have begun unraveling some new theories about the disease from a set of intriguing clues. They know, for example, that the farther you live from the equator, the higher your risk. The map below is based on data collected by the National MS Society.

Click here for the full-size image.

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How Reporters Can Cover the Clean Water Act

After a summer working on Clean Water: The Next Act -- and the better part of a career reporting on water issues -- our executive director Robert McClure went down to the annual conference of the Society of Environmental Journalists in Lubbock, Tex., to talk to other reporters about how to find stories in their own communities. Robert serves on the SEJ board of directors.

He put together this tip sheet as a handout (PDF), and we want to publish it here, too. Without further ado...

The Clean Water Act: How to cover it back home

2012 marks the 40th anniversary of the passage of the Clean Water Act, a bedrock environmental statute that resulted in dramatic increases in the health of America’s waterways. But the law has not accomplished its goals of making America’s waterways uniformly fishable and swimmable.

Some ways you can cover this story in your community or state:

  • A great way to get your feet wet with the Clean Water Act is to simply document the locations and discharges of all the sewage treatment plants, factories and other facilities that dump waste into waterways under the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES, pronouced NIP-deez). Usually this can be obtained as a data file from the state agency delegated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to enforce the Clean Water Act. (Idaho, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and New Mexico do not have this delegation; in those states the EPA enforces the law and will have the data.) Who’s dumping the most? What’s in there? Map ‘em, know ‘em, love ‘em.  You can use this as a reporting tool. Or you could publish to put yourself on the map as a reporter who’s looking into the story.
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'Center of Detention' now available for Kindle

Big (for us) news. We've published our first Kindle book — Center of Detention, by Carol Smith and The News Tribune's Lewis Kamb.

The book is a collection of the reporting that Carol and Lewis did for a series of stories that ran in The News Tribune in September.

Here's something very nice that was said about it in Bender's Immigration Bulletin:

"This extraordinary in-depth investigation reveals the hard truths about the Northwest Detention Center."

- Daniel M. Kowalski, Editor-in-Chief

You can download Center of Detention from Amazon to read on your Kindle, or on a Kindle app for your phone or computer.

If you read it and like it, we'd surely appreciate you leaving a nice review over on Amazon so that other readers who stumble upon the book page have a reason to click Buy. Thanks!

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If Green Roofs And Rain Gardens Are So Great, Why Aren’t There More?

Grants helped pay for this rain garden to be built in West Seattle. Property owners
who choose to build rain gardens see it as a way to beautify their property, increase property values
and reduce pollution through stormwater runoff.
Katie Campbell/EarthFix

The most pervasive water pollution source in American cities and suburbs is the contaminant-laced rainwater that sloughs off hard surfaces like streets and parking lots after a heavy rain, carrying with it the toxic debris of modern life.

Clean Water: The Next Act

This little-noticed form of pollution kills fish and other aquatic creatures, pollutes drinking-water supplies and scours away streambeds that fish such as salmon need to lay eggs. At least since the 1970s, scientists and engineers have been devising methods to intercept –- or better yet, never generate –- this so-called stormwater.

Yet these methods still are not widely mandated, making stormwater one of the leading reasons the Clean Water Act –- passed into law 40 years ago today -– has failed to meet its goal of making all American waterways fishable and swimmable.

Experts’ modern consensus: Handling stormwater is all about building our cities differently, with more greenery to slurp up the rainwater. Techniques to accomplish this include specially designed swales, green roofs, rain gardens and porous pavement that allows the water to soak into the ground instead of gurgling into a stream.

So why are these techniques – part of a new building approach commonly dubbed low-impact development or green stormwater infrastructure – not more widely required in the Pacific Northwest when a developer plunks down building plans at City Hall today?

The explanation differs according to the state:

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How Stormwater Pollution Became A Clean Water Concern

Stormwater runoff carries an assortment of litter and unseen pollutants into
rivers, lakes, and marine waters, including Puget Sound.
Credit: Katie Campbell/EarthFix

Work to develop solutions to the stormwater problem dates at least to the 1970s. Scientists, government officials and others woke up to the problem in a big way in the 1980s.

Clean Water: The Next Act

Fifteen years after adopting the Clean Water Act in 1972, Congress in 1987 amended the statute with directions for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to go after stormwater. But changing the law didn’t fix the problem.

Congress’ action prompted the EPA and its proxies at the state level to begin requiring cities to obtain government permits to operate the systems of gutters, pipes and so forth that dump the polluted stormwater into streams, rivers, lakes and bays. The local governments were required to:

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How We Got Into Such A Mess With Stormwater

Laura James swims inside a stormwater outfall in Puget Sound that she has come
to call "The Monster" because of how much runoff billows from it when it rains.
Michael Bendixen/OPB

SEATTLE — Gliding through the clear, emerald water of Puget Sound, Diver Laura James stopped when something shiny on the bottom caught her eye. She reached down and picked up a tire-flattened beer can.

And then she noticed more garbage — stir straws, bubble gum wrappers, coffee lids, a plastic packet of ketchup — littered across the sound’s sandy floor.

Clean Water: The Next Act

“I didn’t understand what I was seeing at first,” James says. “We’d swim along and we’d see this decaying swath – black with dead leaves and garbage. And then it would go back to normal.”

James, who has been diving in Puget Sound for more than 20 years, recalls the day she discovered the source. The giant submerged column she saw from a distance was in reality a dark plume of runoff flowing out of a pipe.

“It was just billowing and billowing,” James says. “It just made me feel almost helpless because it’s unstoppable.”

She asked herself, “How do we stop something that’s so much bigger than us?”

Path to permanent residency opens for immigrant profiled in 'Center of Detention'

A 39-year-old Mexican national who has lived illegally in Pierce County for more than half of his life will be able to stay in the United States through the end of next year – and possibly longer.

Oscar Campos Estrada's chances for staying in this country permanently took a major step forward when a federal immigration judge recently set his next court date for December 2013.

“He’s a long way from being deported,” Amy Kratz, a Seattle-based immigration lawyer, said Friday of Oscar’s case.

That’s because come May 7 – more than seven months before Oscar’s next court date – his oldest daughter, America, will turn 21. Once she does, she’s eligible as a U.S. citizen to file a green card eligibility petition on behalf of her father.

Unlike other family-based permanent residency petitions that can take years to process, those filed on behalf of the parents of U.S. children 21 and older are considered immediately. In the long line of illegal immigrants seeking green cards, parents of Americans have priority to adjust their immigration status.

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How pollution testing may have gone astray

West Point in Seattle is Washington's largest treatment plant. Although it is in compliance with state limits on pollutants in the wastewater it dumps into Puget Sound, other shortcomings have kept it from winning a state award for perfect performance.
Ned Ahrens/King County

SALT LAKE CITY – Sitting by a table in his basement office, a silver-shocked Peter Maier pulls out four colors of Legos to illustrate how all life is built mostly of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen and carbon – and how one, nitrogen, can be a big pollution problem when not properly handled at sewage-treatment plants.

Clean Water: The Next Act

He rattles through a brief history of modern sewage treatment, including how what he learned in his native Holland gave him great pause when he moved to America in 1978 and saw how sewage was being treated here. Or, to be more precise, how sewage was tested here.

He quotes the late Edmund Muskie, a chief architect of the Clean Water Act, who said during a Senate speech as the legislation neared passage 40 years ago this month:

“Streams and rivers are no longer to be considered part of the waste treatment process.”

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