We’re crowdfunding to fill the environmental reporting gap in Olympia

As we’ve done for the last two years, InvestigateWest is again crowdfunding to support our 2017 Washington Statehouse Environmental News Project, offering in-depth coverage of  the most critical environmental issues facing the Washington Legislature. If you donate today your gift will be doubled or tripled. Unlike Congress, our state legislature is debating environmental policies that may actually become law. Energy and a carbon tax. Toxics.

LIVE: Forests and the Economy Symposium 2015

We’re excited that the 2015 Forests & Economy Symposium in Portland is today! Walk-ins are welcome at 70 NW Couch St. Doors open at 9:15 a.m.

See the final program here. Want to participate in the discussions? Bring your laptop or tablet and join us here, where we’ll be hosting a live blog during the event. Tell us what you think about the issues raised on stage, or submit questions for us to ask the panelists in a special “web-extra” segment to be filmed after the show.

Bruce Daucsavage: ‘The change is about more than just the mills’

In August 2012, Ochoco Lumber Co. announced plans to close its mill in John Day, Oregon, due in part to a shortage of timber supply from neighboring public lands. The announcement meant that rural Grant County would be losing its last surviving sawmill — and with it about 70 jobs in a community already reeling from the recession. The John Day mill seemed destined to become another painful chapter in Oregon’s history of rural economic decline, but three years later, it’s being celebrating as a Douglas fir-sized success story. The difference: an unlikely alliance of environmentalists, timber leaders, and public officials working together to complete the Malheur stewardship agreement, a ten-year forest thinning project expected to produce a reliable timber supply while also improving forest health. Thanks to that agreement, the John Day mill is hiring workers again and exploring new opportunities to expand.